Discussion:
Where is the data?
(too old to reply)
scottjamez
2006-07-07 17:04:49 UTC
Permalink
Hello, Thanks in advance to anyone who can assist me with a rather
neophite question?

We currently have 1 W2k3 DC that is also our main file server. I just
added a 2nd W2k3 Server and set it up as a DC also. The replication of
AD information seems to be working fine (I can down server1 and server2
will still authenticate logins).

I set up a Domain DFS Root on Server1 by creating a Root Target for
that server name with about 10 links to different shares on that same
server. I then added Server2 and made it a DC. I made another Root
Target for that server. I ran the replication wizard and chose the
Ring topology. I left the defaults for the staging areas.

My DFS has both servers listed and all links listed on each server.
The ammount of data in total, between all of the shares on Server1 is
about 75 GB. The location with the shared directory and the links for
the DFS on Server2 has over 1 TB of free storage.

I set up the replication but there are no files being "replicated" to
Server2 (at least none that I can see).

If I go to \\domain\shares i see all my data. I see the Identical data
if I look at \\server1\shares or \\server2\shares.

I need to have the same data on both file servers and have a
replication schedule set up for off hours. For right now the
replication schedule is set to be 24/7.

To sum up my question, "Where is my data on Server2"?

Regards,

Scott
Jill Zoeller [MSFT]
2006-07-07 17:21:40 UTC
Permalink
It sounds like you're replicating the root of your namespace (i.e., you
enabled replication directly on the root). This is something we recommend
against for several reasons (below). What you need to do is enable
replication on individual links, which will sync the data among the targets
of the link. I also highly recommend using Ultrasound and reviewing the
resources at www.microsoft.com/frs.

If upgrading to Windows Server 2003 R2 is an option, please consider doing
so. The new replication engine in R2, called DFS Replication, is more robust
and scalable than FRS.


From the DFS FAQ at
http://www.microsoft.com/windowsserver2003/techinfo/overview/dfsfaq.mspx.
Q. If I use multiple root targets in a domain-based DFS namespace, do I need
to enable replication on the root?

A. No. DFS takes care of creating the necessary folder structures on each
root target. In fact, we recommend against enabling replication on the root,
although this step is sometimes done so that data stored in multiple root
folders stays synchronized. Instead, it is better to store data in link
targets and enable replication on links for the following reasons.

. When you enable replication on the root, morphed folders can occur under
the DFS root folder. Morphed folders occur when two or more identically
named folders on different servers are added to the replica tree. FRS
identifies the conflict during replication, and the receiving member
protects the original copy of the folder and renames (morphs) the later
inbound copy of the folder. The morphed folder names have a suffix of
"_NTFRS_xxxxxxxx" where "xxxxxxxx" represents eight random hexadecimal
digits.

Morphed folders occur in replicated roots for the following reason: When you
create a link in the namespace, DFS creates a link folder under each root
folder on every root server. For example, if you add 1,000 links to a
namespace, DFS creates a link folder under the DFS root folder for each of
those 1,000 links on every root server. When you enable FRS replication on
the root, FRS attempts to replicate its local copy of the folder structure
to every root server. Because each root server has a local copy of the same
folder structure as the incoming changes, FRS identifies the duplicate
folder names and renames the folders that were most recently created. FRS
then replicates all morphed folders to all root targets in the replica set.

. When adding a new root target to an FRS replicated root, you cannot
replicate the contents of individual folders in the root based on business
priority. Instead, the entire contents of the root are replicated to the new
root target. However, if you enable replication only on individual links,
you are creating multiple replica sets, which allows you to enable
replication on the most important links first, and then enable replication
on the links in the namespace as desired.

. You cannot take individual root targets offline. For example, if you are
adding a new root target, users who are referred to the new member might see
incomplete data until replication is complete. However, if you enable
replication on individual links, you can take a new link target offline
while the initial replication takes place or whenever you want to restrict
access to a particular link target.
--
This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no rights.

Want to learn more about Windows Server file and storage technologies? Visit
our team blog at http://blogs.technet.com/filecab/default.aspx.
Post by scottjamez
Hello, Thanks in advance to anyone who can assist me with a rather
neophite question?
We currently have 1 W2k3 DC that is also our main file server. I just
added a 2nd W2k3 Server and set it up as a DC also. The replication of
AD information seems to be working fine (I can down server1 and server2
will still authenticate logins).
I set up a Domain DFS Root on Server1 by creating a Root Target for
that server name with about 10 links to different shares on that same
server. I then added Server2 and made it a DC. I made another Root
Target for that server. I ran the replication wizard and chose the
Ring topology. I left the defaults for the staging areas.
My DFS has both servers listed and all links listed on each server.
The ammount of data in total, between all of the shares on Server1 is
about 75 GB. The location with the shared directory and the links for
the DFS on Server2 has over 1 TB of free storage.
I set up the replication but there are no files being "replicated" to
Server2 (at least none that I can see).
If I go to \\domain\shares i see all my data. I see the Identical data
if I look at \\server1\shares or \\server2\shares.
I need to have the same data on both file servers and have a
replication schedule set up for off hours. For right now the
replication schedule is set to be 24/7.
To sum up my question, "Where is my data on Server2"?
Regards,
Scott
scottjamez
2006-07-07 19:55:19 UTC
Permalink
Thanks for the tip and link, Jill. Would it be advantageous to me
(regarding this issue only) if only Server2 was R2 and Server1 was
still 2k3? My new server came as 2003 r2 but I am running 2k3.
Server2 is the box that I am trying to get data replicated "to".

Thanks,
Scott
Post by Jill Zoeller [MSFT]
It sounds like you're replicating the root of your namespace (i.e., you
enabled replication directly on the root). This is something we recommend
against for several reasons (below). What you need to do is enable
replication on individual links, which will sync the data among the targets
of the link. I also highly recommend using Ultrasound and reviewing the
resources at www.microsoft.com/frs.
If upgrading to Windows Server 2003 R2 is an option, please consider doing
so. The new replication engine in R2, called DFS Replication, is more robust
and scalable than FRS.
From the DFS FAQ at
http://www.microsoft.com/windowsserver2003/techinfo/overview/dfsfaq.mspx.
Q. If I use multiple root targets in a domain-based DFS namespace, do I need
to enable replication on the root?
A. No. DFS takes care of creating the necessary folder structures on each
root target. In fact, we recommend against enabling replication on the root,
although this step is sometimes done so that data stored in multiple root
folders stays synchronized. Instead, it is better to store data in link
targets and enable replication on links for the following reasons.
. When you enable replication on the root, morphed folders can occur under
the DFS root folder. Morphed folders occur when two or more identically
named folders on different servers are added to the replica tree. FRS
identifies the conflict during replication, and the receiving member
protects the original copy of the folder and renames (morphs) the later
inbound copy of the folder. The morphed folder names have a suffix of
"_NTFRS_xxxxxxxx" where "xxxxxxxx" represents eight random hexadecimal
digits.
Morphed folders occur in replicated roots for the following reason: When you
create a link in the namespace, DFS creates a link folder under each root
folder on every root server. For example, if you add 1,000 links to a
namespace, DFS creates a link folder under the DFS root folder for each of
those 1,000 links on every root server. When you enable FRS replication on
the root, FRS attempts to replicate its local copy of the folder structure
to every root server. Because each root server has a local copy of the same
folder structure as the incoming changes, FRS identifies the duplicate
folder names and renames the folders that were most recently created. FRS
then replicates all morphed folders to all root targets in the replica set.
. When adding a new root target to an FRS replicated root, you cannot
replicate the contents of individual folders in the root based on business
priority. Instead, the entire contents of the root are replicated to the new
root target. However, if you enable replication only on individual links,
you are creating multiple replica sets, which allows you to enable
replication on the most important links first, and then enable replication
on the links in the namespace as desired.
. You cannot take individual root targets offline. For example, if you are
adding a new root target, users who are referred to the new member might see
incomplete data until replication is complete. However, if you enable
replication on individual links, you can take a new link target offline
while the initial replication takes place or whenever you want to restrict
access to a particular link target.
--
This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no rights.
Want to learn more about Windows Server file and storage technologies? Visit
our team blog at http://blogs.technet.com/filecab/default.aspx.
Post by scottjamez
Hello, Thanks in advance to anyone who can assist me with a rather
neophite question?
We currently have 1 W2k3 DC that is also our main file server. I just
added a 2nd W2k3 Server and set it up as a DC also. The replication of
AD information seems to be working fine (I can down server1 and server2
will still authenticate logins).
I set up a Domain DFS Root on Server1 by creating a Root Target for
that server name with about 10 links to different shares on that same
server. I then added Server2 and made it a DC. I made another Root
Target for that server. I ran the replication wizard and chose the
Ring topology. I left the defaults for the staging areas.
My DFS has both servers listed and all links listed on each server.
The ammount of data in total, between all of the shares on Server1 is
about 75 GB. The location with the shared directory and the links for
the DFS on Server2 has over 1 TB of free storage.
I set up the replication but there are no files being "replicated" to
Server2 (at least none that I can see).
If I go to \\domain\shares i see all my data. I see the Identical data
if I look at \\server1\shares or \\server2\shares.
I need to have the same data on both file servers and have a
replication schedule set up for off hours. For right now the
replication schedule is set to be 24/7.
To sum up my question, "Where is my data on Server2"?
Regards,
Scott
Jill Zoeller [MSFT]
2006-07-07 20:43:15 UTC
Permalink
To use DFS Replication, all servers in the replication group must run R2. In
addition, a schema change is required as well.
--
This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no rights.

Want to learn more about Windows Server file and storage technologies? Visit
our team blog at http://blogs.technet.com/filecab/default.aspx.
Post by scottjamez
Thanks for the tip and link, Jill. Would it be advantageous to me
(regarding this issue only) if only Server2 was R2 and Server1 was
still 2k3? My new server came as 2003 r2 but I am running 2k3.
Server2 is the box that I am trying to get data replicated "to".
Thanks,
Scott
Post by Jill Zoeller [MSFT]
It sounds like you're replicating the root of your namespace (i.e., you
enabled replication directly on the root). This is something we recommend
against for several reasons (below). What you need to do is enable
replication on individual links, which will sync the data among the targets
of the link. I also highly recommend using Ultrasound and reviewing the
resources at www.microsoft.com/frs.
If upgrading to Windows Server 2003 R2 is an option, please consider doing
so. The new replication engine in R2, called DFS Replication, is more robust
and scalable than FRS.
From the DFS FAQ at
http://www.microsoft.com/windowsserver2003/techinfo/overview/dfsfaq.mspx.
Q. If I use multiple root targets in a domain-based DFS namespace, do I need
to enable replication on the root?
A. No. DFS takes care of creating the necessary folder structures on each
root target. In fact, we recommend against enabling replication on the root,
although this step is sometimes done so that data stored in multiple root
folders stays synchronized. Instead, it is better to store data in link
targets and enable replication on links for the following reasons.
. When you enable replication on the root, morphed folders can occur under
the DFS root folder. Morphed folders occur when two or more identically
named folders on different servers are added to the replica tree. FRS
identifies the conflict during replication, and the receiving member
protects the original copy of the folder and renames (morphs) the later
inbound copy of the folder. The morphed folder names have a suffix of
"_NTFRS_xxxxxxxx" where "xxxxxxxx" represents eight random hexadecimal
digits.
Morphed folders occur in replicated roots for the following reason: When you
create a link in the namespace, DFS creates a link folder under each root
folder on every root server. For example, if you add 1,000 links to a
namespace, DFS creates a link folder under the DFS root folder for each of
those 1,000 links on every root server. When you enable FRS replication on
the root, FRS attempts to replicate its local copy of the folder structure
to every root server. Because each root server has a local copy of the same
folder structure as the incoming changes, FRS identifies the duplicate
folder names and renames the folders that were most recently created. FRS
then replicates all morphed folders to all root targets in the replica set.
. When adding a new root target to an FRS replicated root, you cannot
replicate the contents of individual folders in the root based on business
priority. Instead, the entire contents of the root are replicated to the new
root target. However, if you enable replication only on individual links,
you are creating multiple replica sets, which allows you to enable
replication on the most important links first, and then enable replication
on the links in the namespace as desired.
. You cannot take individual root targets offline. For example, if you are
adding a new root target, users who are referred to the new member might see
incomplete data until replication is complete. However, if you enable
replication on individual links, you can take a new link target offline
while the initial replication takes place or whenever you want to restrict
access to a particular link target.
--
This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no rights.
Want to learn more about Windows Server file and storage technologies? Visit
our team blog at http://blogs.technet.com/filecab/default.aspx.
Post by scottjamez
Hello, Thanks in advance to anyone who can assist me with a rather
neophite question?
We currently have 1 W2k3 DC that is also our main file server. I just
added a 2nd W2k3 Server and set it up as a DC also. The replication of
AD information seems to be working fine (I can down server1 and server2
will still authenticate logins).
I set up a Domain DFS Root on Server1 by creating a Root Target for
that server name with about 10 links to different shares on that same
server. I then added Server2 and made it a DC. I made another Root
Target for that server. I ran the replication wizard and chose the
Ring topology. I left the defaults for the staging areas.
My DFS has both servers listed and all links listed on each server.
The ammount of data in total, between all of the shares on Server1 is
about 75 GB. The location with the shared directory and the links for
the DFS on Server2 has over 1 TB of free storage.
I set up the replication but there are no files being "replicated" to
Server2 (at least none that I can see).
If I go to \\domain\shares i see all my data. I see the Identical data
if I look at \\server1\shares or \\server2\shares.
I need to have the same data on both file servers and have a
replication schedule set up for off hours. For right now the
replication schedule is set to be 24/7.
To sum up my question, "Where is my data on Server2"?
Regards,
Scott
Jill Zoeller [MSFT]
2006-07-07 20:54:09 UTC
Permalink
I misspoke earlier--you can use the version of DFS Management (the snap-in)
in R2 to configure your namespaces and enable some cool new features but not
FRS. You'll have to use the Distributed File System snap-in to configure and
manage FRS.

Take a look at the overview doc at
http://technet2.microsoft.com/WindowsServer/en/Library/d3afe6ee-3083-4950-a093-8ab748651b761033.mspx?mfr=true
to learn more about the new namespace changes introduced in W2K3 SP1,
configurable using this new snap-in.
--
This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no rights.

Want to learn more about Windows Server file and storage technologies? Visit
our team blog at http://blogs.technet.com/filecab/default.aspx.
Post by scottjamez
Thanks for the tip and link, Jill. Would it be advantageous to me
(regarding this issue only) if only Server2 was R2 and Server1 was
still 2k3? My new server came as 2003 r2 but I am running 2k3.
Server2 is the box that I am trying to get data replicated "to".
Thanks,
Scott
Post by Jill Zoeller [MSFT]
It sounds like you're replicating the root of your namespace (i.e., you
enabled replication directly on the root). This is something we recommend
against for several reasons (below). What you need to do is enable
replication on individual links, which will sync the data among the targets
of the link. I also highly recommend using Ultrasound and reviewing the
resources at www.microsoft.com/frs.
If upgrading to Windows Server 2003 R2 is an option, please consider doing
so. The new replication engine in R2, called DFS Replication, is more robust
and scalable than FRS.
From the DFS FAQ at
http://www.microsoft.com/windowsserver2003/techinfo/overview/dfsfaq.mspx.
Q. If I use multiple root targets in a domain-based DFS namespace, do I need
to enable replication on the root?
A. No. DFS takes care of creating the necessary folder structures on each
root target. In fact, we recommend against enabling replication on the root,
although this step is sometimes done so that data stored in multiple root
folders stays synchronized. Instead, it is better to store data in link
targets and enable replication on links for the following reasons.
. When you enable replication on the root, morphed folders can occur under
the DFS root folder. Morphed folders occur when two or more identically
named folders on different servers are added to the replica tree. FRS
identifies the conflict during replication, and the receiving member
protects the original copy of the folder and renames (morphs) the later
inbound copy of the folder. The morphed folder names have a suffix of
"_NTFRS_xxxxxxxx" where "xxxxxxxx" represents eight random hexadecimal
digits.
Morphed folders occur in replicated roots for the following reason: When you
create a link in the namespace, DFS creates a link folder under each root
folder on every root server. For example, if you add 1,000 links to a
namespace, DFS creates a link folder under the DFS root folder for each of
those 1,000 links on every root server. When you enable FRS replication on
the root, FRS attempts to replicate its local copy of the folder structure
to every root server. Because each root server has a local copy of the same
folder structure as the incoming changes, FRS identifies the duplicate
folder names and renames the folders that were most recently created. FRS
then replicates all morphed folders to all root targets in the replica set.
. When adding a new root target to an FRS replicated root, you cannot
replicate the contents of individual folders in the root based on business
priority. Instead, the entire contents of the root are replicated to the new
root target. However, if you enable replication only on individual links,
you are creating multiple replica sets, which allows you to enable
replication on the most important links first, and then enable replication
on the links in the namespace as desired.
. You cannot take individual root targets offline. For example, if you are
adding a new root target, users who are referred to the new member might see
incomplete data until replication is complete. However, if you enable
replication on individual links, you can take a new link target offline
while the initial replication takes place or whenever you want to restrict
access to a particular link target.
--
This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no rights.
Want to learn more about Windows Server file and storage technologies? Visit
our team blog at http://blogs.technet.com/filecab/default.aspx.
Post by scottjamez
Hello, Thanks in advance to anyone who can assist me with a rather
neophite question?
We currently have 1 W2k3 DC that is also our main file server. I just
added a 2nd W2k3 Server and set it up as a DC also. The replication of
AD information seems to be working fine (I can down server1 and server2
will still authenticate logins).
I set up a Domain DFS Root on Server1 by creating a Root Target for
that server name with about 10 links to different shares on that same
server. I then added Server2 and made it a DC. I made another Root
Target for that server. I ran the replication wizard and chose the
Ring topology. I left the defaults for the staging areas.
My DFS has both servers listed and all links listed on each server.
The ammount of data in total, between all of the shares on Server1 is
about 75 GB. The location with the shared directory and the links for
the DFS on Server2 has over 1 TB of free storage.
I set up the replication but there are no files being "replicated" to
Server2 (at least none that I can see).
If I go to \\domain\shares i see all my data. I see the Identical data
if I look at \\server1\shares or \\server2\shares.
I need to have the same data on both file servers and have a
replication schedule set up for off hours. For right now the
replication schedule is set to be 24/7.
To sum up my question, "Where is my data on Server2"?
Regards,
Scott
scottjamez
2006-07-11 17:55:26 UTC
Permalink
Jill,

Thanks for the links. They helped. I now have the Links replicating
with the targets, not the rots replicating with each other. My only
other question is, If Server2 has the shared DFS folder on E:\DFS,
where would I find the replicated data if I was sitting at the console
of server2 and only browsing local volumes?

Thanks!

Scott
Post by Jill Zoeller [MSFT]
I misspoke earlier--you can use the version of DFS Management (the snap-in)
in R2 to configure your namespaces and enable some cool new features but not
FRS. You'll have to use the Distributed File System snap-in to configure and
manage FRS.
Take a look at the overview doc at
http://technet2.microsoft.com/WindowsServer/en/Library/d3afe6ee-3083-4950-a093-8ab748651b761033.mspx?mfr=true
to learn more about the new namespace changes introduced in W2K3 SP1,
configurable using this new snap-in.
--
This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no rights.
Want to learn more about Windows Server file and storage technologies? Visit
our team blog at http://blogs.technet.com/filecab/default.aspx.
Post by scottjamez
Thanks for the tip and link, Jill. Would it be advantageous to me
(regarding this issue only) if only Server2 was R2 and Server1 was
still 2k3? My new server came as 2003 r2 but I am running 2k3.
Server2 is the box that I am trying to get data replicated "to".
Thanks,
Scott
Post by Jill Zoeller [MSFT]
It sounds like you're replicating the root of your namespace (i.e., you
enabled replication directly on the root). This is something we recommend
against for several reasons (below). What you need to do is enable
replication on individual links, which will sync the data among the targets
of the link. I also highly recommend using Ultrasound and reviewing the
resources at www.microsoft.com/frs.
If upgrading to Windows Server 2003 R2 is an option, please consider doing
so. The new replication engine in R2, called DFS Replication, is more robust
and scalable than FRS.
From the DFS FAQ at
http://www.microsoft.com/windowsserver2003/techinfo/overview/dfsfaq.mspx.
Q. If I use multiple root targets in a domain-based DFS namespace, do I need
to enable replication on the root?
A. No. DFS takes care of creating the necessary folder structures on each
root target. In fact, we recommend against enabling replication on the root,
although this step is sometimes done so that data stored in multiple root
folders stays synchronized. Instead, it is better to store data in link
targets and enable replication on links for the following reasons.
. When you enable replication on the root, morphed folders can occur under
the DFS root folder. Morphed folders occur when two or more identically
named folders on different servers are added to the replica tree. FRS
identifies the conflict during replication, and the receiving member
protects the original copy of the folder and renames (morphs) the later
inbound copy of the folder. The morphed folder names have a suffix of
"_NTFRS_xxxxxxxx" where "xxxxxxxx" represents eight random hexadecimal
digits.
Morphed folders occur in replicated roots for the following reason: When you
create a link in the namespace, DFS creates a link folder under each root
folder on every root server. For example, if you add 1,000 links to a
namespace, DFS creates a link folder under the DFS root folder for each of
those 1,000 links on every root server. When you enable FRS replication on
the root, FRS attempts to replicate its local copy of the folder structure
to every root server. Because each root server has a local copy of the same
folder structure as the incoming changes, FRS identifies the duplicate
folder names and renames the folders that were most recently created. FRS
then replicates all morphed folders to all root targets in the replica set.
. When adding a new root target to an FRS replicated root, you cannot
replicate the contents of individual folders in the root based on business
priority. Instead, the entire contents of the root are replicated to the new
root target. However, if you enable replication only on individual links,
you are creating multiple replica sets, which allows you to enable
replication on the most important links first, and then enable replication
on the links in the namespace as desired.
. You cannot take individual root targets offline. For example, if you are
adding a new root target, users who are referred to the new member might see
incomplete data until replication is complete. However, if you enable
replication on individual links, you can take a new link target offline
while the initial replication takes place or whenever you want to restrict
access to a particular link target.
--
This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no rights.
Want to learn more about Windows Server file and storage technologies? Visit
our team blog at http://blogs.technet.com/filecab/default.aspx.
Post by scottjamez
Hello, Thanks in advance to anyone who can assist me with a rather
neophite question?
We currently have 1 W2k3 DC that is also our main file server. I just
added a 2nd W2k3 Server and set it up as a DC also. The replication of
AD information seems to be working fine (I can down server1 and server2
will still authenticate logins).
I set up a Domain DFS Root on Server1 by creating a Root Target for
that server name with about 10 links to different shares on that same
server. I then added Server2 and made it a DC. I made another Root
Target for that server. I ran the replication wizard and chose the
Ring topology. I left the defaults for the staging areas.
My DFS has both servers listed and all links listed on each server.
The ammount of data in total, between all of the shares on Server1 is
about 75 GB. The location with the shared directory and the links for
the DFS on Server2 has over 1 TB of free storage.
I set up the replication but there are no files being "replicated" to
Server2 (at least none that I can see).
If I go to \\domain\shares i see all my data. I see the Identical data
if I look at \\server1\shares or \\server2\shares.
I need to have the same data on both file servers and have a
replication schedule set up for off hours. For right now the
replication schedule is set to be 24/7.
To sum up my question, "Where is my data on Server2"?
Regards,
Scott
Jill Zoeller [MSFT]
2006-07-11 18:27:07 UTC
Permalink
On Server 2, you'd find the replicated data in the folder for whatever local
path you shared. So if your link target is \\server2\share, and e:\DFS is
the local folder that's shared as \\server2\share, then that's where your
data will be.
--
This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no rights.

Want to learn more about Windows Server file and storage technologies? Visit
our team blog at http://blogs.technet.com/filecab/default.aspx.
Post by scottjamez
Jill,
Thanks for the links. They helped. I now have the Links replicating
with the targets, not the rots replicating with each other. My only
other question is, If Server2 has the shared DFS folder on E:\DFS,
where would I find the replicated data if I was sitting at the console
of server2 and only browsing local volumes?
Thanks!
Scott
Post by Jill Zoeller [MSFT]
I misspoke earlier--you can use the version of DFS Management (the snap-in)
in R2 to configure your namespaces and enable some cool new features but not
FRS. You'll have to use the Distributed File System snap-in to configure and
manage FRS.
Take a look at the overview doc at
http://technet2.microsoft.com/WindowsServer/en/Library/d3afe6ee-3083-4950-a093-8ab748651b761033.mspx?mfr=true
to learn more about the new namespace changes introduced in W2K3 SP1,
configurable using this new snap-in.
--
This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no rights.
Want to learn more about Windows Server file and storage technologies? Visit
our team blog at http://blogs.technet.com/filecab/default.aspx.
Post by scottjamez
Thanks for the tip and link, Jill. Would it be advantageous to me
(regarding this issue only) if only Server2 was R2 and Server1 was
still 2k3? My new server came as 2003 r2 but I am running 2k3.
Server2 is the box that I am trying to get data replicated "to".
Thanks,
Scott
Post by Jill Zoeller [MSFT]
It sounds like you're replicating the root of your namespace (i.e., you
enabled replication directly on the root). This is something we recommend
against for several reasons (below). What you need to do is enable
replication on individual links, which will sync the data among the targets
of the link. I also highly recommend using Ultrasound and reviewing the
resources at www.microsoft.com/frs.
If upgrading to Windows Server 2003 R2 is an option, please consider doing
so. The new replication engine in R2, called DFS Replication, is more robust
and scalable than FRS.
From the DFS FAQ at
http://www.microsoft.com/windowsserver2003/techinfo/overview/dfsfaq.mspx.
Q. If I use multiple root targets in a domain-based DFS namespace, do
I
need
to enable replication on the root?
A. No. DFS takes care of creating the necessary folder structures on each
root target. In fact, we recommend against enabling replication on the root,
although this step is sometimes done so that data stored in multiple root
folders stays synchronized. Instead, it is better to store data in link
targets and enable replication on links for the following reasons.
. When you enable replication on the root, morphed folders can occur under
the DFS root folder. Morphed folders occur when two or more identically
named folders on different servers are added to the replica tree. FRS
identifies the conflict during replication, and the receiving member
protects the original copy of the folder and renames (morphs) the later
inbound copy of the folder. The morphed folder names have a suffix of
"_NTFRS_xxxxxxxx" where "xxxxxxxx" represents eight random hexadecimal
digits.
When
you
create a link in the namespace, DFS creates a link folder under each root
folder on every root server. For example, if you add 1,000 links to a
namespace, DFS creates a link folder under the DFS root folder for
each
of
those 1,000 links on every root server. When you enable FRS
replication
on
the root, FRS attempts to replicate its local copy of the folder structure
to every root server. Because each root server has a local copy of the same
folder structure as the incoming changes, FRS identifies the duplicate
folder names and renames the folders that were most recently created. FRS
then replicates all morphed folders to all root targets in the replica set.
. When adding a new root target to an FRS replicated root, you cannot
replicate the contents of individual folders in the root based on business
priority. Instead, the entire contents of the root are replicated to
the
new
root target. However, if you enable replication only on individual links,
you are creating multiple replica sets, which allows you to enable
replication on the most important links first, and then enable replication
on the links in the namespace as desired.
. You cannot take individual root targets offline. For example, if you are
adding a new root target, users who are referred to the new member
might
see
incomplete data until replication is complete. However, if you enable
replication on individual links, you can take a new link target offline
while the initial replication takes place or whenever you want to restrict
access to a particular link target.
--
This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no rights.
Want to learn more about Windows Server file and storage technologies? Visit
our team blog at http://blogs.technet.com/filecab/default.aspx.
Post by scottjamez
Hello, Thanks in advance to anyone who can assist me with a rather
neophite question?
We currently have 1 W2k3 DC that is also our main file server. I just
added a 2nd W2k3 Server and set it up as a DC also. The replication of
AD information seems to be working fine (I can down server1 and server2
will still authenticate logins).
I set up a Domain DFS Root on Server1 by creating a Root Target for
that server name with about 10 links to different shares on that same
server. I then added Server2 and made it a DC. I made another Root
Target for that server. I ran the replication wizard and chose the
Ring topology. I left the defaults for the staging areas.
My DFS has both servers listed and all links listed on each server.
The ammount of data in total, between all of the shares on Server1 is
about 75 GB. The location with the shared directory and the links for
the DFS on Server2 has over 1 TB of free storage.
I set up the replication but there are no files being "replicated" to
Server2 (at least none that I can see).
If I go to \\domain\shares i see all my data. I see the Identical data
if I look at \\server1\shares or \\server2\shares.
I need to have the same data on both file servers and have a
replication schedule set up for off hours. For right now the
replication schedule is set to be 24/7.
To sum up my question, "Where is my data on Server2"?
Regards,
Scott
scottjamez
2006-07-07 20:16:24 UTC
Permalink
Actually, I am confused as to what you mean by "the targets of the
links" rather than replicating at the root. I was under the impression
that the root is what gets replicated, and this, in turn, will
replicate the target links below the root.

Are there any other sugestions or links you could provide so I can
better understand this concept?

- Scott
Post by Jill Zoeller [MSFT]
It sounds like you're replicating the root of your namespace (i.e., you
enabled replication directly on the root). This is something we recommend
against for several reasons (below). What you need to do is enable
replication on individual links, which will sync the data among the targets
of the link. I also highly recommend using Ultrasound and reviewing the
resources at www.microsoft.com/frs.
If upgrading to Windows Server 2003 R2 is an option, please consider doing
so. The new replication engine in R2, called DFS Replication, is more robust
and scalable than FRS.
From the DFS FAQ at
http://www.microsoft.com/windowsserver2003/techinfo/overview/dfsfaq.mspx.
Q. If I use multiple root targets in a domain-based DFS namespace, do I need
to enable replication on the root?
A. No. DFS takes care of creating the necessary folder structures on each
root target. In fact, we recommend against enabling replication on the root,
although this step is sometimes done so that data stored in multiple root
folders stays synchronized. Instead, it is better to store data in link
targets and enable replication on links for the following reasons.
. When you enable replication on the root, morphed folders can occur under
the DFS root folder. Morphed folders occur when two or more identically
named folders on different servers are added to the replica tree. FRS
identifies the conflict during replication, and the receiving member
protects the original copy of the folder and renames (morphs) the later
inbound copy of the folder. The morphed folder names have a suffix of
"_NTFRS_xxxxxxxx" where "xxxxxxxx" represents eight random hexadecimal
digits.
Morphed folders occur in replicated roots for the following reason: When you
create a link in the namespace, DFS creates a link folder under each root
folder on every root server. For example, if you add 1,000 links to a
namespace, DFS creates a link folder under the DFS root folder for each of
those 1,000 links on every root server. When you enable FRS replication on
the root, FRS attempts to replicate its local copy of the folder structure
to every root server. Because each root server has a local copy of the same
folder structure as the incoming changes, FRS identifies the duplicate
folder names and renames the folders that were most recently created. FRS
then replicates all morphed folders to all root targets in the replica set.
. When adding a new root target to an FRS replicated root, you cannot
replicate the contents of individual folders in the root based on business
priority. Instead, the entire contents of the root are replicated to the new
root target. However, if you enable replication only on individual links,
you are creating multiple replica sets, which allows you to enable
replication on the most important links first, and then enable replication
on the links in the namespace as desired.
. You cannot take individual root targets offline. For example, if you are
adding a new root target, users who are referred to the new member might see
incomplete data until replication is complete. However, if you enable
replication on individual links, you can take a new link target offline
while the initial replication takes place or whenever you want to restrict
access to a particular link target.
--
This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no rights.
Want to learn more about Windows Server file and storage technologies? Visit
our team blog at http://blogs.technet.com/filecab/default.aspx.
Post by scottjamez
Hello, Thanks in advance to anyone who can assist me with a rather
neophite question?
We currently have 1 W2k3 DC that is also our main file server. I just
added a 2nd W2k3 Server and set it up as a DC also. The replication of
AD information seems to be working fine (I can down server1 and server2
will still authenticate logins).
I set up a Domain DFS Root on Server1 by creating a Root Target for
that server name with about 10 links to different shares on that same
server. I then added Server2 and made it a DC. I made another Root
Target for that server. I ran the replication wizard and chose the
Ring topology. I left the defaults for the staging areas.
My DFS has both servers listed and all links listed on each server.
The ammount of data in total, between all of the shares on Server1 is
about 75 GB. The location with the shared directory and the links for
the DFS on Server2 has over 1 TB of free storage.
I set up the replication but there are no files being "replicated" to
Server2 (at least none that I can see).
If I go to \\domain\shares i see all my data. I see the Identical data
if I look at \\server1\shares or \\server2\shares.
I need to have the same data on both file servers and have a
replication schedule set up for off hours. For right now the
replication schedule is set to be 24/7.
To sum up my question, "Where is my data on Server2"?
Regards,
Scott
Jill Zoeller [MSFT]
2006-07-07 20:52:05 UTC
Permalink
Hi Scott,

That's a common misconception. Replicating the root only replicates whatever
files/subfolders are stored directly under the root share. Replicating the
root does not in any way replicate link targets or make the namespace itself
more redundant (that's what multiple root targets are for). To make the user
data more redundant, replication must be set up for each individual link
(assuming the link has more than one target). This gives you far more
flexibility in the long run.

We keep all our DFS documentation at www.microsoft.com/dfs. The Technical
Reference is a good place to start if you want an in-depth understanding of
how namespaces work--it's really quite fascinating but also complex. The
step-by-step guide was written for R2 but a lot of the same concepts apply
as far as namespaces go (the terminology and UI is different though). With
your one R2 server you can use the DFS Management snap-in to configure and
manage your namespace but not FRS--you'll need to use the Distributed File
System snap-in for that.
--
This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no rights.

Want to learn more about Windows Server file and storage technologies? Visit
our team blog at http://blogs.technet.com/filecab/default.aspx.
Post by scottjamez
Actually, I am confused as to what you mean by "the targets of the
links" rather than replicating at the root. I was under the impression
that the root is what gets replicated, and this, in turn, will
replicate the target links below the root.
Are there any other sugestions or links you could provide so I can
better understand this concept?
- Scott
Post by Jill Zoeller [MSFT]
It sounds like you're replicating the root of your namespace (i.e., you
enabled replication directly on the root). This is something we recommend
against for several reasons (below). What you need to do is enable
replication on individual links, which will sync the data among the targets
of the link. I also highly recommend using Ultrasound and reviewing the
resources at www.microsoft.com/frs.
If upgrading to Windows Server 2003 R2 is an option, please consider doing
so. The new replication engine in R2, called DFS Replication, is more robust
and scalable than FRS.
From the DFS FAQ at
http://www.microsoft.com/windowsserver2003/techinfo/overview/dfsfaq.mspx.
Q. If I use multiple root targets in a domain-based DFS namespace, do I need
to enable replication on the root?
A. No. DFS takes care of creating the necessary folder structures on each
root target. In fact, we recommend against enabling replication on the root,
although this step is sometimes done so that data stored in multiple root
folders stays synchronized. Instead, it is better to store data in link
targets and enable replication on links for the following reasons.
. When you enable replication on the root, morphed folders can occur under
the DFS root folder. Morphed folders occur when two or more identically
named folders on different servers are added to the replica tree. FRS
identifies the conflict during replication, and the receiving member
protects the original copy of the folder and renames (morphs) the later
inbound copy of the folder. The morphed folder names have a suffix of
"_NTFRS_xxxxxxxx" where "xxxxxxxx" represents eight random hexadecimal
digits.
Morphed folders occur in replicated roots for the following reason: When you
create a link in the namespace, DFS creates a link folder under each root
folder on every root server. For example, if you add 1,000 links to a
namespace, DFS creates a link folder under the DFS root folder for each of
those 1,000 links on every root server. When you enable FRS replication on
the root, FRS attempts to replicate its local copy of the folder structure
to every root server. Because each root server has a local copy of the same
folder structure as the incoming changes, FRS identifies the duplicate
folder names and renames the folders that were most recently created. FRS
then replicates all morphed folders to all root targets in the replica set.
. When adding a new root target to an FRS replicated root, you cannot
replicate the contents of individual folders in the root based on business
priority. Instead, the entire contents of the root are replicated to the new
root target. However, if you enable replication only on individual links,
you are creating multiple replica sets, which allows you to enable
replication on the most important links first, and then enable replication
on the links in the namespace as desired.
. You cannot take individual root targets offline. For example, if you are
adding a new root target, users who are referred to the new member might see
incomplete data until replication is complete. However, if you enable
replication on individual links, you can take a new link target offline
while the initial replication takes place or whenever you want to restrict
access to a particular link target.
--
This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no rights.
Want to learn more about Windows Server file and storage technologies? Visit
our team blog at http://blogs.technet.com/filecab/default.aspx.
Post by scottjamez
Hello, Thanks in advance to anyone who can assist me with a rather
neophite question?
We currently have 1 W2k3 DC that is also our main file server. I just
added a 2nd W2k3 Server and set it up as a DC also. The replication of
AD information seems to be working fine (I can down server1 and server2
will still authenticate logins).
I set up a Domain DFS Root on Server1 by creating a Root Target for
that server name with about 10 links to different shares on that same
server. I then added Server2 and made it a DC. I made another Root
Target for that server. I ran the replication wizard and chose the
Ring topology. I left the defaults for the staging areas.
My DFS has both servers listed and all links listed on each server.
The ammount of data in total, between all of the shares on Server1 is
about 75 GB. The location with the shared directory and the links for
the DFS on Server2 has over 1 TB of free storage.
I set up the replication but there are no files being "replicated" to
Server2 (at least none that I can see).
If I go to \\domain\shares i see all my data. I see the Identical data
if I look at \\server1\shares or \\server2\shares.
I need to have the same data on both file servers and have a
replication schedule set up for off hours. For right now the
replication schedule is set to be 24/7.
To sum up my question, "Where is my data on Server2"?
Regards,
Scott
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